Kii keen to kick start UK retail revolution

Kii keen to kick start UK retail revolution

Kii has announced plans to bring the Internet of Things (IoT) into UK retail by offering specific IoT sales training to store staff


The IoT platform has partnered with Brightstar to launch its children’s tracking product (pictured), and is in talks with a number of mobile networks to bundle the device with smartphones.


The device will be coupled with specific sales training for staff, with CEO Masanari Arai claiming that the way IoT is currently sold is confusing for consumers. He believes that despite the hype surrounding the connected home and wearables, too much time has been spent focusing on the devices instead of teaching retail staff, and consumers, of the benefits of IoT. 

Arai told Mobile that Kii can change this, stating that face-to-face sales will be key when it comes to selling the new device: ‘Companies are talking about wearables and the connected home, and consumers are completely lost. Once you start addressing people’s pain point and providing a solution instead of a device, then IoT will change significantly, and that’s where the market is standing right now.


‘We are trying to partner with mobile operators so if a mother comes into the store, the shop can recommend and bundle this device with a smartphone, and that kind of sales mentality is really important for selling IoT.


‘In the UK we are talking to O2 and Vodafone while Brightstar is talking to the retailers. We provide a turnkey solution, do the sales training, teach staff how to sell, and then we provide end user technical support.’


The children’s tracking device will land in the UK in the second half of 2016 and will be white-labelled out to retailers and networks. Arai expressed confidence that mobile operators will get on board, claiming that previous failed attempts to crack the IoT space have left networks looking at ways to do things differently. 

‘O2 and Vodafone have had trials for this kind of IoT device but none of them have been a success’, he said. ‘So now they’re stepping back and thinking “why?”. If networks can make money out of their customers at a much younger age then there will be a strong motivation to sell it, their ARPU will start to go up.


‘This is a way of introducing the consumer to IoT – before IoT you were just selling hardware and making money at a wholesale price. Now it’s all connecting up and you can come up with a solution to charge a monthly price. Once you get a customer, you can ideally get revenue forever, and you don’t really have to worry about the cost – but you do have to worry about retention of users and how much value you’re providing.’

Kii has announced plans to bring the Internet of Things (IoT) into UK retail by offering specific
IoT sales training to store staff.
The IoT platform has partnered with Brightstar to launch its children’s tracking product (pictured), and is in talks with a number of mobile networks to bundle the device with smartphones.
The device will be coupled with specific sales training for staff, with CEO Masanari Arai claiming that the way IoT is currently sold is confusing for consumers. He believes that despite the hype surrounding the connected home and wearables, too much time has been spent focusing on the devices instead of teaching retail staff, and consumers, of the benefits of IoT.
Arai told Mobile that Kii can change this, stating that face-to-face sales will be key when it comes to selling the new device: ‘Companies are talking about wearables and the connected home, and consumers are completely lost. Once you start addressing people’s pain point and providing a solution instead of a device, then IoT will change significantly, and that’s where the market is standing right now.
‘We are trying to partner with mobile operators so if a mother comes into the store, the shop can recommend and bundle this device with a smartphone, and that kind of sales mentality is really important for selling IoT.
‘In the UK we are talking to O2 and Vodafone while Brightstar is talking to the retailers. We provide a turnkey solution, do the sales training, teach staff how to sell, and then we provide end user technical support.’
The children’s tracking device will land in the UK in the second half of 2016 and will be white-labelled out to retailers and networks. Arai expressed confidence that mobile operators will get on board, claiming that previous failed attempts to crack the IoT space have left networks looking at ways to do things differently.
‘O2 and Vodafone have had trials for this kind of IoT device but none of them have been a success’, he said. ‘So now they’re stepping back and thinking “why?”. If networks can make money out of their customers at a much younger age then there will be a strong motivation to sell it, their ARPU will start to go up.
‘This is a way of introducing the consumer to IoT – before IoT you were just selling hardware and making money at a wholesale price. Now it’s all connecting up and you can come up with a solution to charge a monthly price. Once you get a customer, you can ideally get revenue forever, and you don’t really have to worry about the cost – but you do have to worry about retention of users and how much value you’re providing.’

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